Research

Selected Recent Projects

“Cross-Pressure Scores: An Individual-Level Measure of Cumulative Partisan Pressures Arising from Social Group Memberships”
With Joshua A. Tucker and Ted Brader. Published in Political Behavior (2014) 36: 23–51. (ungated version, replication data and code)
Synopsis: We develop a new method for estimating cross-pressures, incorporating myriad group memberships in a single cross-pressure score reflecting influences from both social interactions and policy preferences. Suitable for multiparty contexts and with only minimal data requirements, our measure allows for cross-pressures to be studied more widely than is currently possible.

“Whose Issue Is It Anyway? A New Look at the Meaning and Measurement of Issue Ownership”
Published in British Journal of Political Science, released on BJPS FirstView April 2015. (ungated version, replication data and code)
Synopsis: Survey questions about party preferences on issues are fundamental to the concept of issue ownership and our understanding of campaigns, yet the process by which respondents answer them remains a mystery. I present the results of a survey experiment to understand what these responses are telling us.

“The Meaningful Effects Hypothesis: Informing, Persuasion, and Vote Choice in the 2000 and 2004 Presidential Campaigns”
Synopsis: Though campaigns are a ubiquitous feature of democratic elections, evidence that they have any impact on votes remains scarce. I aim to clarify our understanding of campaign effects by looking at the role of issue advertising in the 2000 and 2004 US presidential elections, and the results offer a very different picture of campaign effects than seen in previous studies.

“Cross-Pressures and Political Participation”
With Joshua A. Tucker and Ted Brader.
Synopsis: Early researchers coined the term cross-pressures to describe conflicting influences on individuals’ political preferences. We consider the effects of both social cross-pressures (from interactions in one’s social network) and issue cross-pressures (from holding policy preferences which cut across ideological lines) on various forms of political participation.

Selected Conference Presentations and Invited Talks

“Explaining the Paradox of Issue Convergence: A Closer Look at the Content and Strategy of Campaign Messaging”, American Political Science Association, September 2011 (Slides)

“Cross-Pressures and Political Participation”, with Joshua A. Tucker and Ted Brader, American Political Science Association, September 2011 (Slides)

“The Meaningful Effects Hypothesis: Informing, Persuasion, and Vote Choice in the 2000 and 2004 Presidential Campaigns”, Society for Political Methodology, July 2011 (Poster), American Association for Public Opinion Research, May 2011 (Slides)

“Taking Campaign Strategy Online: Using Candidate Websites to Advance the Study of Issue Emphasis”, American Political Science Association, September 2010 (Slides)

“Whose Issue Is It Anyway? Moving Beyond Issue Ownership Toward a Broader Understanding of Campaign Strategy”, Midwest Political Science Association, April 2010 (Slides)

“Issue Advantages in Targeted Campaigns: What a Closer Look at Issue Positions Can Reveal About Campaign Strategy”, Society for Political Methodology, July 2009 (Poster)

“The Cross-Pressured Citizen: Revisiting Social Influence on Voting Behavior”, with Joshua A. Tucker and Ted Brader, Center for the Study of Democratic Politics, Princeton University, May 2009 (Slides)